Latest News

Latest Photos

CPN_202001_001.jpg
CPN_201901_002.jpg
CPN_201901_001.jpg
CPN_201803_004.jpg
CPN_201803_003.jpg
CPN_201803_002.jpg
May 16, 2016

So far the reviews coming in from Cannes Film Festival paint Chris in a very positive light regarding his role in Hell or High Water, which makes me extremely proud. Check out some quotes below:

Variety.com: Directed by Daniel Mackenzie, from a script by Taylor Sheridan (who wrote “Sicario”), it’s a gripping independent production that, with its fusion of offbeat star power and audacious storytelling, has the potential to be a mainstream hit, and possibly an awards contender.

Chris Pine, with his moody sleek glamour and bright blue bedroom eyes, has struggled to find serious dramatic roles that fit him as snugly as Captain Kirk, and this one is undoubtedly his breakthrough. As Toby, who’s divorced with two kids he hasn’t seen for a year, Pine is playing a sexy bad boy with some mileage on him, and he’s quietly mesmerizing. Toby knows how to spring into action, but his downbeat look expresses the pain of every mistake he’s ever made. Ben Foster, wearing a biker ‘stache and a spooked stare that dares you to stare back, makes Tanner an even badder boy, a thief who has spent years in prison and doesn’t have the patience — or faith — to go straight. He’s a sociopathic screwup who knows he’s a screwup (which sort of redeems him).

TheGuardian.com: Mackenzie’s direction and Giles Nuttgens’s cinematography create a kind of horizontal vertigo in the dizzying sweep of the landscape and there is a great soundtrack with original music by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis. It’s an action-thriller with punch; Bridges gives the characterisation ballast and heft and Pine and Foster bring a new, grizzled maturity to their performances.

Telegraph.co.uk: Pine, ever-improving, notches up new respect here for his stalwart underplaying, and Foster’s on fire: his late action scene with a machine gun is hilariously bad-ass, and shot with satisfying, let’s-do-this verve by Giles Nuttgens. The film also shares a cast member the Coens used: a venerable Texan actress called Margaret Bowman, who gets one film-stealing scene, credited as “T-Bone Waitress” – she spits out her lines with such deadly sass it’s only fair not to spoil her punchlines.

Articles : Blurbs : Hell or High Water : 1 Comment : 
May 04, 2016

Lionsgate and CBS Films have set an August release in the U.S. for the heist thriller “Hell or High Water,” starring Jeff Bridges, Chris Pine and Ben Foster.

The movie, directed by David Mackenzie, will open Aug. 12 in limited release, expand on Aug. 19 and go wide on Aug. 26.

The film will premiere later this month in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival.

Pine and Foster portray brothers — a divorced dad and an ex-con — who embark on a daring bank robbery spree to save their family farm in New Mexico. Bridges plays a Texas ranger in pursuit.

The script, penned by Taylor Sheridan, was named to the 2012 Black List. Mackenzie previously won BAFTAs for “Starred Up” in 2014 and “Young Adam” in 2004.

Producers are Sidney Kimmel, Peter Berg, Carla Hacken and Julie Yorn. Production companies are Sidney Kimmel Entertainment, Film 44, LBI Entertainment and OddLot Entertainment.

The project was previously titled “Comancheria.” Shooting began last May in Clovis, New Mexico.

Source: Variety.com

Articles : Hell or High Water : News : 1 Comment : 
March 20, 2016

Check out this utterly handsome photoshoot of Chris take for his Armani Code campaign!

Armani Code : Photos : 2 Comments : 
February 03, 2016

If Chris Pine wants to give up acting for modeling, the new Giorgio Armani fragrance campaign he stars in should get him started. The Star Trek actor looks smokin’ in a teaser for the not-yet-released spot, which features him and a trio of ladies.

The fragrance is the latest addition to the Armani Code range, and is inspired by the Giorgio Armani tuxedo which, of course, Pine wears perfectly. It even features his name embroidered in the label. Expect the campaign to run this month on TV, social media and online, where viewers can scroll through different moments of the party or take a virtual walk alongside Pine.

As for the actual juice, it’s a seductive, masculine scent that has notes of amber, tonka bean and burnt styrax wood, along with green mandarin essence and crisp green apple. From start to finish, it’s about the art and lifestyle of seduction. Safe to say, Pine was a solid pick.

Source: hollywoodreporter.com

Armani Code : Campaigns : Video : 2 Comments : 
February 03, 2016

Over the course of his career, Chris Pine has played an impressively wide variety of characters. He’s been an intergalactic spaceman, a CIA analyst, a post-apocalyptic heartthrob, a reluctant rock god and a mid-century Coast Guard officer. Ask the 35-year-old Pine which role has made him happiest, though, and he’ll inform you that given his druthers, he’d always prefer to sport a hairpiece.

“Anytime I get offered a chance to wear a wig, I will do it,” Pine says one sunny Los Angeles morning, referencing his shaggy, bedraggled character on the Netflix original series Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp. “I really love doing comedy. It’s just not a bad way to spend the day.”

Of course, any day that Pine, who also moonlights as the face of Armani Code, finds himself on camera seems to be a good day—at least for moviegoers. And in the coming months, we’re poised to see plenty of him: first in the dramatic Disney offering The Finest Hours, out now, and then reprising his role as Captain James Kirk in this summer’s Star Trek: Beyond, his third film in the franchise.

In Hours, a 1950s period piece based on the true story of a heroic Coast Guard rescue, Pine plays Bernie Webber, who is sent out in a blizzard to rescue a crew stranded on a sinking oil tanker off the coast of Massachusetts. Reader, if you’re prone to seasickness do not see this film in 3-D. Despite the rocky waters, Pine disappears into his role completely, offering a strong and memorable performance that showcases his dramatic chops and adds significantly to the film’s heart. This is a harrowing story—and it’s one Pine didn’t take lightly.

“If the Coast Guard crew was tasked with doing the same mission the next night and the night after that, they would have done it,” Pine says with reverence. “That’s their job, but they don’t have their names engraved in stone and they don’t take a selfie of the moment. I think that it moves us as artists to remind and re-remind our community that being selfless is something that should be done because it’s the right and good and human thing to do.”

That basic principle is also at the forefront of the big-screen adaptation of Wonder Woman, which Pine is currently filming in London and is slated to premiere in 2017. In the film, Pine plays Steve Trevor, whom he describes as Wonder Woman’s “partner in crime… who falls in love with her.” And despite his history as a leading man in action movies, Pine says he’s just fine playing sidekick to Israeli actress Gal Gadot’s fearsome female lead.

“Action is so synonymous with violence and revenge and eye-for-an-eye; the masculine footprint in the world is so violent and obviously it hasn’t really gotten us anywhere,” Pine says. “A woman at the forefront naturally leads with this compassion, and [is about] giving life instead of taking life. To have a strong woman who represents those qualities, I think we can start injecting this world with a little bit more of the ideology of compassion, love and positive moral strength rather than something destructive.”

It’s a positive energy that Pine’s not only hoping to bring to this world, but to other galaxies as well. Discussing his role in Star Trek, he notes that as the franchise creeps toward its 10th birthday, it’s become an increasingly comfortable gig. “It’s gotten so much better and so much easier,” he says. “This family we built has gotten tighter, stronger and stranger; we fight more and we make up more. It’s a great marriage—we understand each other and what we all do best… And now that J.J. Abrams has left, the kids have taken over the asylum.”

As for what will come next—and whether it’ll involve a wig—Pine says he’s not quite sure, and he isn’t rushing to make any decisions.

“When I was a younger actor, I meditated and marinated over the effect on the long-term and the short-term, the this and the that,” he says. “I thought myself out of so many things I could have done. Now, if a couple of things pop to me, if my internal speedometer is going in that direction, then I say yeah. Let’s rock ‘n’ roll.”

Source: Dujour.com

Articles : Interviews : Photos : 2 Comments :